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Building Loyalty: 7 Web Design Strategies to Earn Your Audience’s Trust

First impressions matter. Your website is often the first place where your audience learns about you. It can help them decide whether they want to do business with you – or leave and never come back. Designing and optimizing a website properly can help you gain your audience’s trust and loyalty and can benefit your business immensely. Below are seven strategies that can help you earn your audience’s trust and loyalty. 1. Have a Solid Website Design A website with bad design, confusing navigation, and poor content can turn visitors away from your business quick. Conversely, an intuitive and appealing website can make visitors stay longer, increasing the chances of conversion. Having a responsive and mobile-friendly website is of the utmost importance. A responsive website adapts to the screen size and device it is being viewed on so it looks great regardless if you’re using a mobile phone, tablet, or desktop. More than eight in 10 Internet users will use a mobile device to access the web regularly this year, according to a forecast by eMarketer. Further, nearly 15 percent of Internet users, or 40.7 million individuals, will only surf the web via a mobile device (and this number is only expected to grow). In addition, your website needs to be visually appealing and designed with your users in mind. Make it easy for your visitors to browse your website by using simple navigation, readable fonts and color combinations, interesting graphics, and appropriate white space. To complement your design, your website content should be well written, engaging and helpful to your target audience. Doing a yearly website cleanup is a good way to keep your content fresh. 2. Be Transparent & Helpful In order to build trust and gain loyalty from your audience, you’ll need to demonstrate competence and credibility. Show your visitors that you are a transparent organization by being true to your motives and interests. Your About Us page is a good place to share information on what your company stands for, who your employees are, what you’re offering, how it works, and why you’re different from the rest of your competitors. Creating a knowledge base and publishing blog posts are also good ways to engage your audience. Visitors are more likely to trust your website if you provide them with valuable content resources, answers to frequently asked questions, and blog posts that will help them solve their

How To Apply Consistency in Web Design

How To Apply Consistency in Web Design There’s tremendous value in consistency of digital interfaces. People browsing the web encounter dozens of websites that all have different styles, yet most feature very similar page elements. Most designers don’t even think about these features. Page headers, navigation menus, body copy, CTA buttons, the list seems endless. By designing with consistency you’ll learn how to create interfaces that encourage typical user behaviors. Your layouts will build trust and teach users repeatable patterns that help them work through your site much quicker. Design For User Expectations Most users expect websites to work a certain way. It should scroll vertically, links should be clickable, and the navigation should be visible right from the first page load. How you design these expectations is completely up to you. But when you’re designing for consistency you want to keep a clear uniform design across the entire layout. For visual consistency on the web, I think BodyBuilding.com is a pristine example. This site has many portals linking to their forums, their eCommerce shop, and their online help guides. All of these pages have the same design and the same navigation to keep them consistent with the entire site. Users don’t want to think. They just want to act and get results. Consistent design helps this happen. Do the thinking for your user to understand what they need. How would you design a blog page to encourage reading? What about ane-commercee shop to encourage checkouts? Think about these questions yourself and apply them to your web projects. Which elements should be consistent on every page? This line of thinking always leads to solutions. The homepage of Sketch is very consistent with certain user behaviors and expectations. The page has two CTAs: one for downloading a demo and one for buying the program. But not everyone who visits the site wants either of those options. The top nav becomes the obvious next step. Someone new to the site might care about features or how Sketch works. But an existing user might want to look into extensions or get support. Add consistent elements with clear in goals. If you know what users expect to do on your site then you can design for those expectations. One more point to consider is with redesigning a layout. The popular social news site Reddit has been online for well over 10 years. Over that time they have made a few changes, but generally,

5 Ways Web Design Impacts Customer Experience

5 Ways Web Design Impacts Customer Experience Web design is one of the most important parts of any Internet marketing strategy. It has a huge impact on the digital customer experience in several different ways. Your site’s aesthetics, usability, any other crucial factors are essential to your company’s long-term online success. But how dramatically does it actually impact your bottom line? In this post, we’ll take a look at five major aspects of web design and how you can improve all of them. 1. Appearance Web design most obviously impacts your site’s appearance. You choose how your site looks, which plays a huge role in your company’s first impression on new online visitors. Often, you’ll hear marketing experts (including us) talk about web design in two extremes: Older websites that look like they were made in 1996 Newer, sleeker websites that adhere to modern web design standards Many websites fall between those two options, but they represent opposite ends of a spectrum. It’s possible to have a site somewhere in the middle — one that looks attractive, but maybe it was last updated in 2007. Regardless of how your site looks, the goal is to have it as current and up-to-date with modern design trends as you can. Modern web design trends include: Responsive design Parallax scrolling Big, bold fonts Eye-catching “hero” images Multimedia Responsive design means using a code on your website that makes it look and function the same, regardless of the device someone uses to access it. So whether someone comes to your site from a smartphone or a desktop computer, they’ll get a great experience and find the information they want. Parallax scrolling means overlaying two visual elements on a page and moving them at different speeds as someone scrolls. Then, when someone looks through a page on your site, they’ll get a cutting-edge visual experience that keeps them engaged and reading. Big, bold fonts have been in vogue for a few years now. Essentially, the concept refers to using sans-serif typefaces that are easy to read on screens. That makes your customer experience smoother, and it lets your readers get the most value out of every sentence on your site. Eye-catching “hero” images are giant, full-width graphics at the top of articles that give you a summarizing visual representation of the text below. They got the name “hero” because these images champion the article with

20 Examples Of Bad Web Design | Top Design Magazine – Web Design and Digital Content

20 Examples Of Bad Web Design Writen by Bogdan / Comments Off on 20 Examples Of Bad Web Design There are Yin and Yang, Black and White, Hot and Cold and unfortunately…Good Design and Bad Design. Since there must be a balance in the Universe, good design can`t exist alone. Below you can see 20 examples of very bad web design. PS: I`m really sorry if you are an owner of some of these websites, but hey: consider this free advertising. wateronwheels.com gatesnfences.com mrbottles.com industrialpainter.com as-grafixs.de liceomilitar.edu.uy citydeli.com petersbuss.se irishwrecksonline.net ptbalirealestate.com 007museum.com mamascheesies.com rzent.co.nr raft.org arngren.net rogerart.com mickeythomas.com joesplacepizzaandpasta.com lingscars.com yvettesbridalformal.com Are you interested in 70-662 certifications? Get our self-paced cent & SY0-301 practice questions and ccie study packages to pass your exam without any intricacy in mcp. Bogdan Bogdan is the founder of Top Design Magazine. You can find him in Bucharest-Romania so next time you want to drink a beer there and talk about web and stuff, give him a message.   TDM S.R.L

The Meaning and Purpose of Responsive Web Design

The Meaning and Purpose of Responsive Web Design It used to be so simple: you’d design a website or application for a 15-inch monitor, and—incompatibilities between browsers aside—you were done. Then mobile phones with web browsers came along and ruined our easy lives. Worst of all, people loved browsing the Web on them! In 2016, browsing the web on mobile devices overtook desktop browsing for the first time. Just as developers and designers got used to building websites for phones, along came tablets, watches, TVs, cars, glasses, larger desktop screens, high-resolution screens, and even web browsers built into walls. (Okay, I made that last one up.) Supporting this seemingly endless stream of new devices is becoming ever more challenging. So how do we support this ever-increasing array of devices? The answer is responsive web design, which harnesses technologies that allow websites to adapt to screens of all sizes. A lot of older sites, or projects maintained by people with little spare time, are unresponsive. For example, the site for the Vassal game engine: Many other sites, like SitePoint.com, are fully responsive: Responsive web design (RWD) subscribes to the popular development maxim “Don’t Repeat Yourself” (usually abbreviated to “DRY”). Instead of maintaining multiple code bases for each device that you wish to support, RWD aims to use a single code base that adapts appropriately to each device. Using RWD techniques, you write one set of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and display elements appropriately for each platform. Many of these styles and elements can even be reused or built upon for maximum code efficiency. Sound good to you? To begin, let’s go back in time a few years. .new-css { border:solid 3px rgb(36,179,181) !important; border-radius:2px !important; background-color: rgb(36,179,181) !important; } div.f-large { font-weight: 400 !important; } a.u-grey { padding: 10px; } ga('SitePointPlugin:observeImpressions', 'maestro-603') History “Responsive” design is not necessarily new and is a term that can mean different things to different people, making its exact history hard to track down. In theory, developers have been creating responsive designs since there was more than one browser. Browsers have always had subtle (and not so subtle) rendering differences between them, and developers have been learning how to cope with these quirks for decades. If you’re new(er) to web development, be thankful the dominance of Internet Explorer’s earlier versions is mostly over. The days of dealing with their quirks were dark. Since 2004, responsive design

15 Inspirational Examples of Minimal Web Design

15 Inspirational Examples of Minimal Web Design Considering that the current philosophy of UI design is “less is more,” the expected rise in popularity of minimalism has reached an all-time high amongst web designers, especially in the last couple of years. But, perhaps unknowingly, its appeal to users has also grown. The principles of minimalism in web design are that a website (and other mediums as well) should be stripped down to their bare bones, while carefully making use of whitespace and improving readability with clearer typography. When implemented correctly, the result will allow users to focus on what’s truly important without being distracted by non-essential elements.  Important Elements While this may sound easy, it can be difficult deciding what the truly important elements are and what’s little more than decoration. It can also be risky. Accidentally removing a seemingly innocuous element could be deemed critical by the user and could result in the wrong message (or worse, no message at all) being delivered to your target audience. If you think about the logistics, it makes sense that minimalism appeals to users: the less fluff on the site, the less you have to think about. When there are just a few links or blocks of text, and the point of interest is directly in front of you, you can let your mind rest for a bit – relax, and the website will spoon feed you just what you need. Trends This collection features fifteen websites that have been designed using the minimalistic principles mentioned above. Some of the sites have also been influenced by many of the popular web design trends we have seen over that past year or so, like flat design, yet still retain a look and feel that can only be described as minimal. Here are the beautifully designed sites: Finished Minimalism isn’t the miracle solution that you can slap on every single project. There are a time and place for everything; the time is now, but you need to carefully decide the place. Paul Andrew Considering that the current philosophy of UI design is “less is more,” the expected rise in popularity of minimalism has reached an all-time high amongst web designers, especially in the last couple

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